PREPARING TO BUILD A NEW NORFOLK ONE STEP AT A TIME

The New Norfolk Plan 

20727283_10154644890215988_215413333_o.jpg
What does the Commissioner of the Revenue do?

Many know that the Commissioner of the Revenue office collects taxes for real property and vehicles, but there is more to the office than local taxation.  The office of the Commissioner of the Revenue involves collection of taxes that are applied to the city of Norfolk for resources to the residents.  Them office also collects fees for business licenses and works with businesses on taxation.

The Commissioner also oversees the taxation assessment for Norfolk residents and businesses, including providing much needed resources to underserved areas and disenfranchised communities experiencing food deserts.  Public policy is also an important part of the Commissioner's office in helping to access, analyze, and recommend certain projects and programs for the city of Norfolk while working with the office of the Mayor and City Council members.


I am personally passionate about educational programs and courses in our Norfolk public school system as the Commissioner of the Revenue.

One such course involves the understanding of what it means to be fiscally financially fit.  My eldest daughter, Cierra came to me wondering why such classes are not available to ALL students, but to students that are in a particular program or vocation.  I began to inquire more into the lack in the curriculum that would benefit all and found that other local school system mandates such classes as a requirement for their students.  As Commissioner of the Revenue, it will be my goal to work with the city council and the mayor’s office to make this class available to help our youth survive and thrive after graduation.  It is my drive as an advocate to make sure that priorities such as this are afforded to All students in the Norfolk Public School System.

I ask that you help me build a #NewNorfolk by volunteering, donating to my cause and campaign, and tell five friends about my campaign.  Remember early voting starts September 17, 2021, and the general election on November 2, 2021!

"I may be last on the ballot for Commissioner of the Revenue, but I am first in advocacy and community activism in Norfolk, Virginia."

~Nicole Sanders

Nicole intends to help Norfolk residents in the following areas:
  • Community Listening sessions:  We are listening to our residents and not doing all the talking. Listening and working to keep small and large businesses in Norfolk to help with the city's economic growth.

  • ·Assist new business owners with creating businesses in the city and maintain current relationships with current small and large business owners.

  • ·Assist citizens with tax compliance, investigations, and delinquent accounts.

  • Assess and add more opportunities for open assessments of property taxes (Option online with website redesign)

  •  Review all current tax relief and exemption programs.

  •  Update technology- Provide a more updated and efficient website where citizens can easily access resources.

Accountability
  • The constituents of Norfolk demand more accountability from our elected officials. They entrust our civil servants to work their best interests and advocate on their behalf; however, I think we can all agree they have become disillusioned by predecessors' poor decisions and political rhetoric. It is time to empower our community to work cooperatively with the city government to make decisions in the people's best interest.

  • The Commissioner of Revenue reports directly to the people, and I want to be that person who reports to you.

  • Our constituents want respect and integrity of those whom they voted into office.

  • Many officials forget who helped place them there as a unified voice and do not correct their needs. There must be more cooperation between the community and the city government.

 Community Involvement

To ensure a fiscally strong city, we must have financially strong citizens and small businesses; I want the office of the Commissioner of Revenue to work for and with the people.

Nicole believes that real estate property and property taxation changes are crucial to ensuring equity for all Norfolk residents, including programs to educate and help ease debt.

 

The Commissioner of Revenue should continuously access, modify, and end programs that empower the deterioration of disadvantaged communities within our city.

 

Too many thriving small businesses are not returning and reopening their doors due to issues they face with the Office of Commissioner. My mission is to change the process of small business ability to open and be a viable part of growing the economy of the City of Norfolk.

  • To ensure a fiscally strong city, we must have financially strong citizens and small businesses; I want the office of the Commissioner of Revenue to work for and with the people.

  • Nicole believes that real estate property and property taxation changes are crucial to ensuring equity for all Norfolk residents, including programs to educate and help ease debt.

  • The Commissioner of Revenue should continuously access, modify, and end programs that empower the deterioration of disadvantaged communities within our city.

  • Too many thriving small businesses are not returning and reopening their doors due to issues they face with the Office of Commissioner. My mission is to change the process of small business ability to open and be a viable part of growing the economy of the City of Norfolk.

Fiscal Responsibility and Accountability
  • The city officials, and the constituents, need to be on one accord. We should be in agreeance on investing for and in our city. Constituents need to understand the revenue and cash flow of the city.

  • We should understand the collection of the finances in the city and distribution throughout the city and not the partiality of exclusive areas.

  • Norfolk deserves a commissioner who is accountable, fair, neutral, transparent, and trustworthy Commissioner of Revenue handles, negotiates, and the City of Norfolk's best interests.

Norfolk Occupancy Taxation 

Did, you know? The city of Norfolk office of the Commissioner of the Revenue and City Council assesses the highest in taxation at a rate of 9% on transient/homestay rental occupancy tax and a nightly fee of 3.00. Homestay Rental is defined as a space within a dwelling unit for rent to a guest for fewer than 30 consecutive nights when the property owner is present on the premises throughout the entire rental period. Vacation Rental is defined as a property for rent for fewer than 30 consecutive nights when the property owners are not present in the home. The other question is, "Do you know if this revenue goes back into enhancing tourism for the city?" These questions need answers. Let's see what other cities in Hampton Roads assess in taxation for tourism rental/transient stays:

Chesapeake:

Every hotel, motel, tourist home, or other lodging places that, for compensation, furnishes lodging to any person temporarily (90 consecutive days or less) must collect the appropriate lodging tax. Those entities collecting such tax must register with the Commissioner of the Revenue and file the proper returns monthly. The tax rate is 8% of the total Hotel/motel bill, plus a flat-rate tax of $1.00 for each room occupied per night. https://www.cityofchesapeake.net/government/city-departments/departments/comm-rev/business-services/tax-and-licensing/miscellaneous-local-taxes.htm

 

Hampton:

The City of Hampton, Virginia, imposes a tax on the rental of daily rental property (for real estate, see lodging tax) in the amount of 1% on the gross proceeds of such business. This tax must be charged and collected by every business engaged in the short term rental business and must be remitted to the City quarterly no later than the 20th day of April (quarter ending March 31), July (quarter ending June 30), October (quarter ending September 30) and January (quarter ending December 31). A "short-term rental business" is one in which not less than 80% of its gross rental receipts in any year are from transactions involving rental periods of 92 consecutive days or less, including all extensions and renewals to the same person or a person affiliated with the lessor. (For additional information regarding "affiliation," please see Hampton City Code §37-337). https://hampton.gov/1085/Short-Term-Rental-Tax

Newport News:

The Short-Term Rental tax is 1% on gross proceeds. Every qualifying short-term rental business is obligated to charge and collect the tax from the customer at the time of the rental. The quarterly reporting of short-term rental property tax must be filed no later than the 15th day of the month following the end of each quarter. The filing required to be submitted on the 15th will be your billing and will be paid no later than the last day of the month following the end of the collection quarter. https://www.nnva.gov/614/Short-Term-Rental-Tax

 

Portsmouth:

Every hotel (public or private), inn hostelry, tourist home or house, motel, rooming house, or other lodging places within the City offering to lodge for compensation to any transient (90 consecutive days or less) must collect an 8% lodging tax (Plus an additional $3.00 per night, per room, effective July 1, 2019.). Those entities collecting the tax must register with the Commissioner of the Revenue, report, and remit the tax on or before the 20th of the month following the month of collection. https://www.portsmouthva.gov/202/Lodging-Tax

 

Williamsburg:

All transient lodging establishments, including but not limited to public or private hotels, inns, hostelries, tourist homes or houses, motels, rooming houses, or other lodging places offering to lodge for compensation, are to register for and collect transient occupancy tax, in addition to the state sales tax. View Code of the City of Williamsburg Section 18-236 through 245. The $2 per room-night tax money is used for tourism development and promotion in the Historic Triangle area. Fifty percent of these funds are paid to market the destination to the Historic Triangle Marketing Fund administered by the Tourism Council of the Greater Williamsburg Area Chamber and Tourism Alliance. Fifty percent of the funds remain with the City and are deposited in the Tourism Development Fund for investment in tourism products. Code of the City of Williamsburg Section 18-236 and Code of Virginia 58-1-3823 C. https://www.williamsburgva.gov/242/Meal-Room-Lodging-Taxes Now the next question is, "Do you know if this revenue goes back into enhancing and inviting the growth in tourism for the city?"

As your Commissioner of them REvenue, I would further investigate into the over-taxation on transient/homestay rentals in comparison to our sister cities and work with the tax assessment office, City Treasurer, and City Council on finding a better way in taxation of homestay rental and ensure the revenue from the taxes and fees collected go back into enhancing our tourism board and City.

Help and support me to grow our community, and build our city as an ultimate tourist attraction while building the #NewNorfolk. Vote Nicole Sanders during early voting and November 2nd!